Posts Tagged ‘logic’

An extract for someone I know to illustrate some content from Dr Craig & that is likely interesting to others also.

Some of this is “heavier philosophy”, but I find the way of thinking fascinating somehow – mostly in matters more relevant to normal life than ‘intentionality’, discussed here. This is likely because philosophy is really something that everyone “tries their hand at”, without realizing they do & even the most educated in other professions make basic mistake in reasoning & logic that just exposes a basic deficiency in their ability to reason things through … and what is a more basic requirement for educators & “opinion makers” of the “class of fame” of Richard Dawkins and the like. If they are found out failing in logical & reasoning capability, how can we take them seriously?

Dawkins actually made a famous error of the same kind – maybe depending on who you ask. The issue was confusing mechanism & agency in the very famous God Delusion Debate with John Lennox.

Reasonable Faith Podcast – Objections to the Ontological Argument. Listen to full audio here.

Audio: A lecture touching on all these elements by John Lennox.

Bertrand Russell (British mathematician & philosopher) described a common materialist position when he said:

“Whatever knowledge is attainable, must be attainable by scientific methods, and what science cannot discover, mankind cannot know.”

Note, however, that this statement is extreme Scientism and that it is logically incoherent in itself. It is not a statement of science but an article of blind faith. Thus by its own assertion we cannot know if it is true. Note the use of the term “blind faith” because it likely describes a belief held in spite of evidence.

John Lennox, Professor of Mathematics and Philosophy of Science at Oxford, observes that Scientism even denies the validity of any non-scientific fields such as philosophy, ethics, literature, poetry, art and music. He also said:

“Science can tell you that if you add strychnine to someone’s drink, it will kill her, but it cannot tell you whether it is morally right or wrong to put strychnine in your grandmother’s tea in order to get your hands on her property.”

It is, as obviously true to most people, possible to have such knowledge of right and wrong, even though it is clearly beyond the scope of science.