Posts Tagged ‘life’

What does this tell you?

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AlbertMohler.com – The Briefing 08-26-13. Listen to full audio here.

Any idea what average student debt is in the US today? Listen to audio below.

Any wonder that marriage and having kids are delayed? The prevailing worldview likely sees no problem with that. Try watch Demographic Winter – with Nobel Prize winner & members of parliament interviewed. You would likely find your worldview challenged in an incontrovertible way. The full documentary was on YouTube also – may still be.

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AlbertMohler.com – The Briefing 05-30-13. Listen to full audio here.

What if your most valuable, character-building day in your entire life was the day you went fishing with your dad & your dad’s journal is found many years later, with the entry for that day as: “Went fishing with my son today. A day wasted.

May God help us to value the things we may see as “little”, but mean the world to our “little ones”!

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Line of Fire Radio – “It Only Takes One”. Listen to full audio here.

The Pilgrim’s Progress (…from this world to that which is to come) is a Christian allegory written by John Bunyan and published in February, 1678. It is regarded as one of the most significant works of religious English literature, has been translated into more than 200 languages, and has never been out of print.

The Pilgrim’s Progress was written during Bunyan’s imprisonment for violations of the Conventicle Act, which prohibited the holding of religious services outside the auspices of the established Church of England.

Pilgrim’s Progress is ranked #9 on Amazon in classic British literature at the time of this writing. It received a 5 star rating from 87% of readers. The audiobook (by Answers In Genesis) is highly recommended (you may find it slightly cheaper at other retailers).

Here’s a preview of a recent movie that may appeal more to those that struggle to start a new book. The book has much more detail & should still be well worth the read.

Don’t miss the audio extract from the message as delivered (in a church) by Martin Luther King above.

The Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. speaks from the pulpit on courage, Selma, AL, March 8, 1965.

Deep down in our non-violent creed is the conviction there are some things so dear, some things so precious, some things so eternally true, that they’re worth dying for. And if a man happens to be 36-years-old, as I happen to be, some great truth stands before the door of his life – some great opportunity to stand up for that which is right.

A man might be afraid his home will get bombed, or he’s afraid that he will lose his job, or he’s afraid that he will get shot, or beat down by state troopers, and he may go on and live until he’s 80. He’s just as dead at 36 as he would be at 80. The cessation of breathing in his life is merely the belated announcement of an earlier death of the spirit. He died…

A man dies when he refuses to stand up for that which is right. A man dies when he refuses to stand up for justice. A man dies when he refuses to take a stand for that which is true.

So we’re going to stand up amid horses. We’re going to stand up right here in Alabama, amid the billy-clubs. We’re going to stand up right here in Alabama amid police dogs, if they have them. We’re going to stand up amid tear gas!

We’re going to stand up amid anything they can muster up, letting the world know that we are determined to be free!

Check out Line of Fire Radio. Listen to full audio here. Audio segment here.

So, the criteria for the diagnosis for autism is being updated, one would wonder why…
“More than a year before a new definition is expected to appear in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders–the standard mental-health reference used by psychiatrists and insurers–a scientific catfight has erupted over the best way to recategorize the spectrum of symptoms that comprise autism disorders. Many experts say the proposed definition, which is still being assessed, will narrow the criteria for autism. The question is, How much?”

Source: Time Magazine

until we also hear that “nearly 40 percent of the children ever diagnosed with autism disorders didn’t currently have autism, the parents reported. That rate is much higher than ever found by autism recovery researchers. Outside experts said they doubt it reflects a true rate of recoveries. Autism could have been suspected and later ruled out for some of the children, the authors wrote.”

Source: Huffington Post (also in Time article, but not available there for free viewing, see link above)

AlbertMohler.com, The Briefing. Listen to full audio here.

The benefits of being able to extend another life with the unused parts of your body seem obvious – although I’m not necessarily endorsing that either – we need to work these moral issues out for ourselves. The concern here is if we are sure those ‘parts of your body’ are really unused & unnecessary according to the tests commonly used to certify death?

Becoming an organ donor seems like a win-win situation. Some 3.3 people on the transplant waiting list will have their lives extended by your gift (3.3 is the average yield of solid organs per donor). You’re a hero, and at no real cost, apparently.

But what are you giving up when you check the donor box on your license? Your organs, of course – but much more. You’re also giving up your right to informed consent. Doctors don’t have to tell you or your relatives what they will do to your body during an organ harvest operation because you’ll be dead, with no legal rights.

The most likely donors are victims of head trauma (from, say, a car or motorcycle accident), spontaneous bleeding in the head, or an aneurysm – patients who can be ruled dead based on brain-death criteria. But brain deaths are estimated to be just around 1% of the total. Everyone else dies from failure of the heart, circulation and breathing, which leads the organs to deteriorate quickly.

The current criteria on brain death were set by a Harvard Medical School committee in 1968, at a time when organ transplantation was making great strides. In 1981, the Uniform Determination of Death Act made brain death a legal form of death in all 50 states.

The exam for brain death is simple. A doctor splashes ice water in your ears (to look for shivering in the eyes), pokes your eyes with a cotton swab and checks for any gag reflex, among other rudimentary tests. It takes less time than a standard eye exam. Finally, in what’s called the apnea test, the ventilator is disconnected to see if you can breathe unassisted. If not, you are brain dead. (Some or all of the above tests are repeated hours later for confirmation.)

Here’s the weird part. If you fail the apnea test, your respirator is reconnected. You will begin to breathe again, your heart pumping blood, keeping the organs fresh. Doctors like to say that, at this point, the “person” has departed the body. You will now be called a BHC, or beating-heart cadaver.

Still, you will have more in common biologically with a living person than with a person whose heart has stopped. Your vital organs will function, you’ll maintain your body temperature, and your wounds will continue to heal. You can still get bedsores, have heart attacks and get fever from infections.

“I like my dead people cold, stiff, gray and not breathing,” says Dr. Michael A. DeVita of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. “The brain dead are warm, pink and breathing.”

You might also be emitting brainwaves. Most people are surprised to learn that many people who are declared brain dead are never actually tested for higher-brain activity. The 1968 Harvard committee recommended that doctors use electroencephalography (EEG) to make sure the patient has flat brain waves. Today’s tests concentrate on the stalk-like brain stem, in charge of basics such as breathing, sleeping and waking. The EEG would alert doctors if the cortex, the thinking part of your brain, is still active.

But various researchers decided that this test was unnecessary, so it was eliminated from the mandatory criteria in 1971. They reasoned that, if the brain stem is dead, the higher centers of the brain are also probably dead.

But in at least two studies before the 1981 Uniform Determination of Death Act, some “brain-dead” patients were found to be emitting brain waves. One, from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke in the 1970s, found that out of 503 patients who met the usual criteria of brain death, 17 showed activity in an EEG.

Even some of the sharpest critics of the brain-death criteria argue that there is no possibility that donors will be in pain during the harvesting of their organs. One, Robert Truog, professor of medical ethics, anesthesia and pediatrics at Harvard Medical School, compared the topic of pain in an organ donor to an argument over “whether it is OK to kick a rock.”

But BHCs – who don’t receive anesthetics during an organ harvest operation – react to the scalpel like inadequately anesthetized live patients, exhibiting high blood pressure and sometimes soaring heart rates. Doctors say these are simply reflexes.

Source: Wall Street Journal
Audio: AlbertMohler.com – The Briefing. Listen to full audio here.