Posts Tagged ‘drugs’

U.S. probes use of antipsychotic drugs on children.

If you thought kids are being put on Ritalin etc too often, you are obviously right. Reality is sinking in slowly, or maybe not so slowly in the psychiatric profession. Listen to audio below.

Extracts: Prescription of powerful anti-psychotic drugs for children has tripled. 1 in 10 Americans prescribed anti-depressants, including 1 in 4 women in 40s and 50s. Use of ADHD drugs increased by 50% in England.

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Federal health officials have launched a probe into the use of antipsychotic drugs on children in the Medicaid system, amid concern that the medications are being prescribed too often to treat behavioral problems in the very young.

Some doctors say there is too much emphasis on medicating children instead of working with them and their caregivers to understand what is triggering their behavior. Dr. Glenn Saxe, chairman of child and adolescent psychiatry at NYU-Langone Medical Center and a proponent of trauma-focused therapy, says psychiatry has missed “big opportunities to help children. This problem has led to kids being medicated more and more.”
Dr. Siles agrees that lots of children could be helped by trauma-centered therapy, “but there is no budget for it.”

Government Medicaid data indicate that some of the prescriptions are being written for very young children. An analysis by Mathematica found that in 2008, 19,045 children age 5 and under were prescribed antipsychotics through Medicaid.

Government Medicaid data indicate that some of the prescriptions are being written for very young children. An analysis by Mathematica found that in 2008, 19,045 children age 5 and under were prescribed antipsychotics through Medicaid, 3% of recipients under 20, up from 7,759 in 1999, according to James Verdier, a senior fellow at the organization.

Data from the inspector general’s five-state probe indicate that 482 children 3 and under were prescribed antipsychotics during the period in question, including 107 children 2 and under. Six were under a year old, including one listed as a month old. The records don’t indicate the diagnoses involved.

Texas said about five children under the age of 1 had been prescribed antipsychotics during the time period of the probe, including two who were five months old.

Dr. Stephen Cha, a chief medical officer at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, the HHS agency that foots some of the bill for drugs prescribed to Medicaid recipients, says the government wants to reduce what he termed “the unnecessarily high utilization of antipsychotics.” He urges doctors to consider other approaches, including therapy to help children and families cope with psychological trauma that could be at the root of behavior issues. – Source : Wall Street Journal

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The Briefing 08-16-13. Listen to full audio here.

20130528-220905.jpgWhen “20% of all American kids have a mental disorder” (sic) and psychiatrists diagnose ADHD differently on a massive scale, 9% of American kids vs. less than 0.5% of French kids, what does that tell us? Listen below…

See also: Why French kids don’t have ADHD?“, as published in Psychology Today. Note the extract & bold portions below.

French child psychiatrists don’t use the same system of classification of childhood emotional problems as American psychiatrists. They do not use the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders or “DSM”.

To the extent that French clinicians are successful at finding and repairing what has gone awry in the child’s social context, fewer children qualify for the ADHD diagnosis. Moreover, the definition of ADHD is not as broad as in the American system, which, in my view, tends to “pathologize” much of what is normal childhood behavior. The DSM specifically does not consider underlying causes. It thus leads clinicians to give the ADHD diagnosis to a much larger number of symptomatic children, while also encouraging them to treat those children with pharmaceuticals.

The French holistic, psycho-social approach also allows for considering nutritional causes for ADHD-type symptoms—specifically the fact that the behavior of some children is worsened after eating foods with artificial colors, certain preservatives, and/or allergens.

And then, of course, there are the vastly different philosophies of child-rearing in the United States and France. These divergent philosophies could account for why French children are generally better-behaved than their American counterparts. Pamela Druckerman highlights the divergent parenting styles in her recent book, Bringing up Bébé. I believe her insights are relevant to a discussion of why French children are not diagnosed with ADHD in anything like the numbers we are seeing in the United States.

From the time their children are born, French parents provide them with a firm cadre—the word means “frame” or “structure.” Children are not allowed, for example, to snack whenever they want. Mealtimes are at four specific times of the day. French children learn to wait patiently for meals, rather than eating snack foods whenever they feel like it. French babies, too, are expected to conform to limits set by parents and not by their crying selves. French parents let their babies “cry it out” if they are not sleeping through the night at the age of four months.

French parents, Druckerman observes, love their children just as much as American parents. They give them piano lessons, take them to sports practice, and encourage them to make the most of their talents. But French parents have a different philosophy of discipline. Consistently enforced limits, in the French view, make children feel safe and secure. Clear limits, they believe, actually make a child feel happier and safer—something that is congruent with my own experience as both a therapist and a parent. Finally, French parents believe that hearing the word “no” rescues children from the “tyranny of their own desires.” And spanking, when used judiciously, is not considered child abuse in France.

As a therapist who works with children, it makes perfect sense to me that French children don’t need medications to control their behavior because they learn self-control early in their lives. The children grow up in families in which the rules are well-understood, and a clear family hierarchy is firmly in place. In French families, as Druckerman describes them, parents are firmly in charge of their kids—instead of the American family style, in which the situation is all too often vice versa.

AlbertMohler.com – The Briefing. Listen to full audio here.

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21 minute audio extract of 2 hour discussion:

Full audio, listen below or download here for hour 1 and hour 2. Extract audio downloadable here.

Hour 1:
Hour 2:

America teeters on a precipice. In the midst of financial turmoil, political uncertainty, declining morality, the constant threat of natural disasters, and a myriad of other daunting challenges, many wonder what the future holds for this once-great nation. Is America an empire in decline or a nation poised for a historic Renaissance? Will history’s greatest democracy stage a miraculous comeback, returning to the forefront of the world’s economic and spiritual stage? Can America’s religious past be repeated today with a third Great Awakening? Or will the rise of China, Russia, and other nations, coupled with the U.S.’s internal struggles, send her into a decline from which there can be no return? This special will help listeners understand the economic, social, and spiritual challenges facing the United States in the 21st century, through the lens of biblical prophecy.

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Which picture below shows an addiction scenario? …and why do people, in their millions, suddenly seek pharmaceutical solutions to the challenges of life? How is this generation so different from all those before?!

So, again, which picture shows an addiction scenario? Not the happy-looking people, we suppose, right? Don’t be deceived. Psychiatric drugs very often do not resolve the ‘condition’. Ask many people that experienced this themselves or that knew a family member on & off these drugs (like in my case). How well did it work? How was quality of life improved (or not)? Looking at the statistics alone tells us there is a massive problem … and we’re not addressing it in the right way. The book at the bottom of the page might be useful for more info (no, the author of this post doesn’t get sales commission). You can also see Dr Breggin’s site.

Check out AlbertMohler.com – The Briefing. Listen to full audio here.


Grief could soon be a “disorder” according to the new version of the DSM. Great, now more people can get drugs for trying to deal with more things that it won’t help for. That way the poor drug companies can get more cash & we can employ lots more ‘professionals’ to give them business. Forgive my sarcasm. It’s a scam. Note how thin that first DSM in the photo is. Wonder why it ‘grew’ so much…?

When does a broken heart become a diagnosis? In a bitter skirmish over the definition of depression, a new report contends that a proposed change to the diagnosis would characterize grieving as a disorder and greatly increase the number of people treated for it.  The criteria for depression are being reviewed by the American Psychiatric Association, which is finishing work on the fifth edition of its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, or D.S.M., the first since 1994. The manual is the standard reference for the field, shaping treatment and insurance decisions, and its revisions will affect the lives of millions of people for years to come.

From: Grief Could Join List of Disorders – New York Times

AlbertMohler.com, The Briefing. Listen to full audio here.


“Big Mike’s” Story. Living on the streets & in violent gangs Chicago, even seeing many of his friends killed in the process. Chasing money, fancy cars etc. & eventually found that all these things didn’t bring fulfilment. Now ministering to people, just as broken as he used to be.

Fire School missionary in China. Real existing persecution in China, as also mentioned in the book by Brother Yun. The terrible pain caused by the one-child-policy & the struggle for the Chinese church to even start to counter abortion & infanticide.

Fire School missionary among homeless in Atlanta. How he realised that “following Jesus” meant the end of his live & the start of completely new life in Jesus. Joel carries a big wooden cross around as a tool to witness – which might seem weird & foolish, but it actually draws people to him & it also gets everyone that comes to talk to him right to the topic at hand. Brilliant actually. 🙂

Fire School missionary in Tanzania. Previously suicidal & used to “pretty things & luxury” she made a new life in Africa at age 50.
Fire School missionary in ‘depraved Holland’. The challenges in the culture that are pioneers in legalized same-sex marriage, prostitution, drugs & euthanasia.

Fire School missionary in Kurdistan talks about the countries the gospel took him to & the massive impact the powerful call to the Great Commission had on him – just by a random missionary at a train station.

And Jesus came and said to them, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptising them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you.” – Matthew 28