Posts Tagged ‘debate’

Very interesting comments and observations from Michael Brown on the alert bulletin below (from Jews for Judaism) & some background on how written debates are pushed by counter missionaries, but normal debates are persistently declined, except by close personal friend Shmuley Boteach. Also an interesting agreement for a written debate agreed upon before, but pulled as advised by more senior rabbis based on initial responses from the Jewish side – by people active on discussion forums.

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Line of Fire Radio – Encouragement from the Front Lines of Jewish Ministry and Dr. Brown Takes Your Jewish-Related Calls. Listen to full audio here.

Is it hypocritical of Jewish Rabbis refusing to do audio debates & then insisting on written debates? Also note the enlightening information about interaction between Michael Brown & Tovia Singer in the third segment – just let player continue playing.

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Line of Fire Radio – 22/02/2013 Dr. Brown Q & A. Listen to full audio here.

debateAround 15,000 people watched the live debate between William Lane Craig and Alex Rosenberg on “Is Faith in God Reasonable?”. View number, as of this writing, sits around 26000. The debate, hosted at Purdue University, was watched online live around the world with all 50 states represented and over 60 countries and the conversation trended (top spot for a few hours) on Twitter (#GODdebate).

A potential spoiler, or something to attract your attention more… post debate voting about the best argument was 4-2 by the formal panel, 1390-303 by the audience, 734-59 online. You can watch & guess which side got the mentioned votes. Also note the bottom of this post after you watched. (more…)

Michael Brown’s story of how he became probably the foremost Jewish Apologist of our time & how he interacted with rabbis in his early days, how he still does (in private) & how rabbis refuse to debate him because … “he’s a good debater”? Where are the good debaters of the Jewish world?

The site here was set up to encourage a debate between Brown & Rabbi Singer some time ago.

Line of Fire Radio. Listen to full audio here.

Don’t think it won’t happen. It is (around the topic of ‘gay rights’ in this case). Maybe soon around your neighbourhood. The lines have been & are being drawn… you have to choose if you haven’t yet. Skip to 7:00 in the audio clip for reference.

Line of Fire Radio. Listen to full audio here.

Recent debate between Dr. Michael Brown and Dr. Eric Smaw on Same-Sex Marriage at the University of Central Florida:









Isaiah 53: A key messianic prophecy? Why do many Jews disagree? Are their objections reasonable?

If you’re Jewish, did you know that there is a Midrash that talks about the Messiah being risen up higher than Abraham, Moses & even the angels?

Invitation to debate Rabbi Tovia Singer on this topic also mentioned. Debate from several years ago here.

Objections addressed in “Answering Jewish Objections to Jesus, Volume 3, Messianic Prophecy Objections“:

4.1. If Jesus is really the Messiah, and if he is so important, why doesn’t the Torah speak of him at all?
4.2. Nowhere in the Hebrew Bible are we told that we must “believe in the Messiah.”
4.3. Isaiah 7:14 does not prophesy a virgin birth! And it has nothing whatsoever to do with Jesus, since it dealt with a crisis seven hundred years before he was born.
4.4. Isaiah 9:6[5] does not speak of a divine king (or Messiah).
4.5. If you want to know what Isaiah 53 is talking about, just read Isaiah 52 and 54. The context is the return of the Jewish people from Babylonian exile, 550 years before Jesus.
4.6. Isaiah 53 speaks of the people of Israel, not Jesus (or any Messiah).
4.7. The rabbis only applied Isaiah 52:13–15, not 53:1–12, to the Messiah son of David.
4.8. It is not true that the medieval rabbis were the first to apply Isaiah 53 to Israel instead of the Messiah. The Israel interpretation is actually very ancient.
4.9. Isaiah 53 contains the words of the repentant kings of the nations rather than the words of the Jewish people.
4.10. Several key words in Isaiah 53 speak of a servant in the plural.
4.11. Isaiah 53 cannot refer to Jesus because it says no one was interested in the servant of the Lord or attracted to him, yet the New Testament records that large crowds followed Jesus.
4.12. Isaiah 53 cannot refer to Jesus because it says the servant of the Lord was sickly and died of disease.
4.13. Isaiah 53 does not actually say the servant would die.
4.14. Isaiah 53 does not say the servant will rise from the dead.
4.15. Isaiah 53 cannot refer to Jesus because it says the servant of the Lord did no violence, yet Jesus drove out the Temple money changers with a whip.
4.16. Isaiah 53 cannot refer to Jesus because it says the servant of the Lord would not lift up his voice or cry out, yet Jesus cried out several times on the cross, once in near blasphemy (Psalm 22:1).
4.17. Isaiah 53 cannot refer to Jesus because it says the servant of the Lord would see seed, an expression always meaning physical descendants when used in the Hebrew Bible.
4.18. Daniel 9:24–27 has nothing to do with the Messiah.
4.19. Daniel 9:24 was clearly not fulfilled by Jesus.
4.20. Christian translations of Daniel 9:24–27 divide the seventy weeks incorrectly, and the dates have no relation to the times of Jesus.
4.21. Daniel 9:24–27 speaks of two anointed ones.
4.22. Psalm 2:12 should not be translated as “kiss the Son.” Only the King James Version and modern Christian fundamentalist translations still maintain this incorrect rendering.
4.23. Psalm 16 does not speak of the resurrection of the Messiah.
4.24. Psalm 22 is the story of David’s past suffering. There is nothing prophetic about it.
4.25. Psalm 22 does not speak of death by crucifixion. In fact, the King James translators changed the words of verse16[17] to speak of “piercing” the sufferer’s hands and feet, whereas the Hebrew text actually says, “Like a lion they are at my hands and feet.”
4.26. Some of the so-called Messianic prophecies in the Psalms actually speak of the psalmist’s sin and folly. How can you apply this to Jesus?i
4.27. Psalm 40 is absolutely not Messianic in any way.
4.28. Psalm 45:6[7] does not say the Messiah is God.
4.29. Psalm 110 does not say the Messiah is Lord. Also, the psalm is not written by David about the Messiah. Our traditions indicate it may have been written by Eliezer about his master, Abraham, and then added to the collection of the Psalms by David many years later. Or David wrote it for the Levites to recite about him (or a court poet wrote it about David). This much is sure: It does not teach that the Messiah is God!
4.30. You claim that Haggai 2 points to the fact that the Messiah had to come before the Second Temple was destroyed, since it says in verse 9 that the glory of the Second Temple would be greater than the glory of Solomon’s Temple. Actually, Haggai is speaking about only the physical splendor of the Second Temple, which surpassed Solomon’s Temple in the days of Herod.
4.31. Zechariah 12:10 has nothing to do with Jesus.
4.32. Jesus fulfilled none of the Messianic prophecies!
4.33. Jesus fulfilled none of the provable Messianic prophecies!
4.34. Even modern Christian scholars reject the so-called Old Testament proof texts about Jesus. Just check most modern Christian Bible commentaries and translations.
4.35. Jesus cannot be the Messiah because the Messiah was to be a reigning king, whereas Jesus was despised, rejected, and crucified.
4.36. Jesus cannot be the Messiah because the Messiah had to rebuild the Temple, yet the Temple was standing in Jesus’ day.
4.37. The only true prophecy about Jesus in the Hebrew Scriptures is found in Zechariah 13:1–6—a passage dealing with false prophets. It even makes explicit reference to his crucifixion!
4.38. Paul claimed that the Hebrew Scriptures prophesied the resurrection of the Messiah on the third day. Nowhere in our Bible is such a prophecy found.
4.39. I can find prophecies in the Bible that point to Muhammad just as easily as you can find prophecies that point to Jesus. That’s because all of your so-called proofs are either distortions, make-believe creations, or Jewish midrash—free, homiletical interpretations—of the worst kind.

Science-based morality? William Lane Craig discusses Sam Harris and his book “The Moral Landscape”, as well as their upcoming debate.

Reasonable Faith Podcast.