Posts Tagged ‘addiction’

20130528-220905.jpgWhen “20% of all American kids have a mental disorder” (sic) and psychiatrists diagnose ADHD differently on a massive scale, 9% of American kids vs. less than 0.5% of French kids, what does that tell us? Listen below…

See also: Why French kids don’t have ADHD?“, as published in Psychology Today. Note the extract & bold portions below.

French child psychiatrists don’t use the same system of classification of childhood emotional problems as American psychiatrists. They do not use the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders or “DSM”.

To the extent that French clinicians are successful at finding and repairing what has gone awry in the child’s social context, fewer children qualify for the ADHD diagnosis. Moreover, the definition of ADHD is not as broad as in the American system, which, in my view, tends to “pathologize” much of what is normal childhood behavior. The DSM specifically does not consider underlying causes. It thus leads clinicians to give the ADHD diagnosis to a much larger number of symptomatic children, while also encouraging them to treat those children with pharmaceuticals.

The French holistic, psycho-social approach also allows for considering nutritional causes for ADHD-type symptoms—specifically the fact that the behavior of some children is worsened after eating foods with artificial colors, certain preservatives, and/or allergens.

And then, of course, there are the vastly different philosophies of child-rearing in the United States and France. These divergent philosophies could account for why French children are generally better-behaved than their American counterparts. Pamela Druckerman highlights the divergent parenting styles in her recent book, Bringing up Bébé. I believe her insights are relevant to a discussion of why French children are not diagnosed with ADHD in anything like the numbers we are seeing in the United States.

From the time their children are born, French parents provide them with a firm cadre—the word means “frame” or “structure.” Children are not allowed, for example, to snack whenever they want. Mealtimes are at four specific times of the day. French children learn to wait patiently for meals, rather than eating snack foods whenever they feel like it. French babies, too, are expected to conform to limits set by parents and not by their crying selves. French parents let their babies “cry it out” if they are not sleeping through the night at the age of four months.

French parents, Druckerman observes, love their children just as much as American parents. They give them piano lessons, take them to sports practice, and encourage them to make the most of their talents. But French parents have a different philosophy of discipline. Consistently enforced limits, in the French view, make children feel safe and secure. Clear limits, they believe, actually make a child feel happier and safer—something that is congruent with my own experience as both a therapist and a parent. Finally, French parents believe that hearing the word “no” rescues children from the “tyranny of their own desires.” And spanking, when used judiciously, is not considered child abuse in France.

As a therapist who works with children, it makes perfect sense to me that French children don’t need medications to control their behavior because they learn self-control early in their lives. The children grow up in families in which the rules are well-understood, and a clear family hierarchy is firmly in place. In French families, as Druckerman describes them, parents are firmly in charge of their kids—instead of the American family style, in which the situation is all too often vice versa.

AlbertMohler.com – The Briefing. Listen to full audio here.

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For those not aware, games like World of Warcraft are seriously addictive & often in a really destructive way as another addict describes to The Guardian. It also doesn’t take much guesswork to see (if you have ‘eyes to see’) the occult involved in this game – do a Google image search for “world of warcraft” if you really want to. Sin & “the wayward path” would be much easier to resist if it didn’t seem like fun right? Well… you need to look out for the eventual effect / final end, or as in Hebrew, the Aharit. Many have turned at hearing the Aharit message, preached many years ago. Listen to it below or download here.


Anders Behring Breivik has described how he “trained” for the attacks he carried out in Norway last summer using the computer game Call of Duty: Modern Warfare.

The 33-year-old said he practised his shot using a “holographic aiming device” on the war simulation game, which he said is used by armies around the world for training.

“You develop target acquisition,” he said. He used a similar device during the shooting attacks that left 69 dead at a political youth camp on the island of Utøya on 22 July.

Describing the game, he said: “It consists of many hundreds of different tasks and some of these tasks can be compared with an attack, for real. That’s why it’s used by many armies throughout the world. It’s very good for acquiring experience related to sights systems.”

He added: “If you are familiar with a holographic sight, it’s built up in such a way that you could have given it to your grandmother and she would have been a super marksman. It’s designed to be used by anyone. In reality it requires very little training to use it in an optimal way. But of course it does help if you’ve practised using a simulator.”

The prosecution asked Breivik if he was aware that “there are some bereaved people sitting here in the courtroom who lost children at Utøya”. How do you think they are feeling, Breivik was asked. “They are probably reacting in a natural way, with disgust and horror,” he said.

The court also heard that Breivik took what he called a “sabbatical” for a year between the summers of 2006 and 2007, which he devoted to playing another game, World of Warcraft (WoW), “hardcore” full time. He admitted he spent up to 16 hours every day that year playing from his bedroom in his mother’s Oslo flat.

But he insisted WoW had nothing to do with the attacks he carried out last year, leaving 77 dead.

Breivik said he “deserved” his sabbatical because he had worked an average of 12-14 hours every day between 2002 and 2006 on various entrepreneurial projects.He said: “I felt I had sacrificed a lot. Because of that I felt I deserved to take one year off to do what I wanted. Especially bearing in mind the upcoming so-called suicide action … I wanted to have no remorse as to what I had missed out on.”

He denied playing the game and moving back in with his mother because his business ventures, including a firm selling fake diplomas, had failed.

“If you assess what you read in media, you would think I moved back home and rented a room in my mother’s house because my company had gone bankrupt,” he said, claiming to have had 600-700,000 rone (£65,000-76,000) in bank accounts and 300,000KR (£32,5000) in cash, which he stashed in two safes in his bedroom at the start of his sabbatical. He only filed for bankruptcy to save on the accounting costs associated with winding down a company in a conventional way, he said.

He said his friends and family, particularly his mother, reacted with “shock and disbelief” when he announced he was going to play on his computer full time.“I told her that I was going to allocate time to do what I had wanted to do. She reacted in that way, which is [a] fairly normal, healthy reaction,” he said, adding: “It would have been quite abnormal if she had just said: ‘Oh that’s great, go ahead.’ I couldn’t tell her I was taking a sabbatical because I was going to blow myself up in five years’ time. I played on the idea that: ‘Ooh, I’ve become addicted to games.’ That was my primary cover.”

It was a convenient “cover” and allowed him to isolate himself and concentrate on his forthcoming “operation”. But he insisted repeatedly he was not a loner and had been out and about in the months leading up to the attacks in July last year.

Breivik was also asked about his membership of the masons. He said he joined because it was a “Christian organisation [untrue] which has protected many European traditions” but said he was not an active member.

It was a “hobby”, he said, claiming to have only attended “about five” meetings. It was another “militant nationalist” who suggested he join, he claimed. – Source: The Guardian

Check out Line of Fire Radio. Listen to full audio here.


Which picture below shows an addiction scenario? …and why do people, in their millions, suddenly seek pharmaceutical solutions to the challenges of life? How is this generation so different from all those before?!

So, again, which picture shows an addiction scenario? Not the happy-looking people, we suppose, right? Don’t be deceived. Psychiatric drugs very often do not resolve the ‘condition’. Ask many people that experienced this themselves or that knew a family member on & off these drugs (like in my case). How well did it work? How was quality of life improved (or not)? Looking at the statistics alone tells us there is a massive problem … and we’re not addressing it in the right way. The book at the bottom of the page might be useful for more info (no, the author of this post doesn’t get sales commission). You can also see Dr Breggin’s site.

Check out AlbertMohler.com – The Briefing. Listen to full audio here.

The French philosopher Jacques Ellul talked about “the technological imperative”, that is, once that technology exists it virtually demands to be used.

What does the “growing omnipresence of screens” do for reading in this digital age?

Recently a group of researchers at the New York University School of Medicine considered the difference that a screen makes. In other words, what’s the kind of attention that is required by listening into a classroom lecture, by reading a book, or by staring at a digital screen. One of the interesting things they discovered is that many children and young people who have attention deficit problems don’t have a problem staring at a screen and the reality is that the screen is giving them immediate gratification, immediate rewards, there are changes in pattern, there is movement on the screen. The child or the young person does not have to invest any kind of imagination in the task. The screen is providing everything for them. These researchers and pediatricians are beginning to wonder if the screen is not having a dramatic effect on the way that young people and for that matter, let’s just be honest many older people are having their brains taught to learn, and to think, and yes even to read.

Check out AlbertMohler.com, Thinking in Public. Listen to full audio here.