obedience to Jesus as Lord … is that earning your salvation? – 05min

Posted: October 27, 2012 in Uncategorized
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Let it be known that the author of this blog sees no salvation possible other than “Lordship Salvation”. Simply put, who should wear the crown in your life? See Revelation 4:10.

The following quoted from Theopedia:

Lordship salvation

“By this it is evident who are the children of God, and who are the children of the devil: whoever does not practice righteousness is not of God, nor is the one who does not love his brother.” (1 John 3:10, ESV)

Lordship salvation is the position that receiving Christ involves a turning in the heart from sin and, as a part of faith, a submissive commitment to obey Jesus Christ as Lord. It also maintains that progressive sanctification and perseverance must necessarily follow conversion. Those who hold to the doctrine of perseverance of the saints see this not only as a requirement, but an assured certainty according to the sustaining grace of Christ.

The doctrine of lordship salvation has implications for evangelism, assurance, and the pursuit of holiness. The grace of God in salvation not only forgives, but transforms, and a lack of obedience or transformation in a person’s life is warrant to doubt that they have been born again. The grounds for assurance include not only the objective promises of God (like John 3:16), but also the internal testimony of the Spirit (Romans 8:16) and holiness the Spirit produces in our lives (1 John 2:3-4,19).

The non-lordship salvation position is popularly known by critics as “easy believism”, and by adherents as “free grace”. However, proponents of Lordship salvation frown upon this usage of the term “free grace”, as the free grace spoken of in the Bible both justifies the sinner and transforms the heart unto obedience.

Media:
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Critical

Check out Line of Fire Radio. Listen to full audio here.

Comments
  1. Noel says:

    It sounds like the discipleship that the “Lordship salvation” entails is similar to what some Christians label as the “saved by works” approach. The “free grace” is more like the concept that all you need is faith in Jesus in order to be saved. But when we add the notion that you must also work for the Kingdom of Heaven, then people jump into the conclusion that we are trying to earn salvation. Salvation to me is to genuinely divorce from our selfish nature and become servants of others in need (thus servants of God). Because loving others is the same as loving God. It does not necessarily mean earning a ticket to go to “heaven”, but more like living “heaven on earth” by practicing the Kingdom of Heaven while still on this earth.

    • Servant says:

      Hi Noel. I don’t understand “lordship salvation” as you do, although it sounds like we basically agree in general – that your faith should be visible by your works … but not in a way trying to earn your salvation. Since John Piper holds to “lordship salvation” also this isn’t even a non-Calvinist view … although it sounds related & that’s what got me interested in the topic. I’m not a Calvinist … after much investigation into the topic. This “lordship salvation” shows me that even Calvinists recognize that grace is not ‘cheap’ like much of the professing church declare it to be these days. It’s a sad state of affairs & has done massive damage to the Body of Messiah, I believe. Shalom 🙂

      http://www.lineoffireradio.com/2012/10/09/the-savior-is-the-lord

  2. Servant says:

    Added an additional audio segment when you click ‘play’. Once segment will play after the other.

  3. […] obedience to Jesus as Lord … is that earning your salvation? – 05min (societystacktrace.wordpress.com) […]

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